Teens Covered for the Lord

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    History of America and Austraila

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    Jordyn

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    Location : Indiana

    History of America and Austraila

    Post  Jordyn on Tue Jan 10, 2012 8:12 pm

    Hello everyone! Today in history we learned about ancient Austrailia, the Aborigines.
    I will tell you what it says in my history book.
    Lets imagine we are an Aboriginal boy, more than a thousand years ago. Rulu lives in a clan( a group of people who lived thousands of years ago) in South Austrailia. Rulu calls all of the men of the clan "father" and all of the women of the clan "mother". Rulu has thirty-six adults who can tell him stories at night-- and spank him if he puts mud in his sisters hair! Very Happy The clan fathers began to teach Rulu about hunting a year ago, when he was seven.At first, they taught him to fish in the ocean, and Rulu loves fishing. Last time they went they caught a big sea cow. Rulu's mouth starts to water as he thinks of the fresh slices of meat with chunks of blubber balanced on top. But now the clan has moved inland, farther away from the ocean. It is dry season, and food is scarce. Late one night, Rulu catches a bat, and he and his sister roasts it over the fire along with a handful of moths. Roasted moths are Rulus favorite snack, he says they taste like crunchy, furry nuts. But there is not anough moths to fill his belly. In the morning, he is hungry again-- ands so is the rest of the clan. So Rulu and two other fathers of the clan set out to hunt for food. Before the leave camp, they coat themselves with lastnights ashes, so the kangaroos can't smell their human sent. They start off for the nearest watering hole. When they got there, they find kangaroo tracks on the ground. But the water hole is dry, and they will need water for the long wait. Rulu starts digging a hole with his hands and soon, he has to lay down to dig. Then his hand hits something hard and cold. Rulu whoops with joy as he scoops a water frog out of the hole. Water frogs suck in water in the wet season, and hibernats in the dry season. Rulu squirts water fresh from the frogs body into his mouth.Now he is ready. Rulu and the fathers find a big kangaroo eating fresh green leafs. They quietly dig a large pit in the ground, and cover it with rich green leafs. They crouch down for the long wait. Rulu and the fathers wait for hours. Rulu is tired and his foot has fallen asleep.But he knows he must stay perfectly still. Soon, the big, brown animal hops over. He sees the fresh leafs, and takes a big bound into the pit with a crash. The three take their kill back to camp, where the women have worked hard on collecting lizards and snakes. There will be a feast toningt! Rulu smelled the fresh kangaroo meat and fresh snake filling the air. He eats until he can hardly move. He goes and lies down. He has had a busy day, and he can't keep his eyes open, and finally, he drifts to sleep, thinking of the cold snake meat in the morning.

    Hope you liked it!
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    Jordyn

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    Re: History of America and Austraila

    Post  Jordyn on Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:04 pm

    So, I forgot to this minsion earlier in my other message. How about we all look up facts and stories about America and Ausrailia. you can look up the facts and write them down, thentype them on the forum. I think it will help us learn more things about our counries, and give us something to do! Laughing So please reply!
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    Rachel
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    Re: History of America and Austraila

    Post  Rachel on Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:31 am

    Before European settlement, there were about 500 tribes and languages in Australia. Look at this map http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/. Today, most of those language are no extinct - no-one speaks them. Some have been completely lost; no-one knows anything about the language or what it sounds like. I know there is one language which we only know even ever existed because a white settler wrote somethings down!

    Where I live at the moment, it's the traditional land of the Peramangk people. I don't actually know anything about them. I've not been in this area long and where I used to live was Kuarna land (pronounce 'Kuarna' as 'GAR-nuh'). At official ceremonies, whoever's officiating has to say 'We meet on the traditional lands of the Kuarna people and we respect that their customs and traditions are just as important to the living Kuarna people today as they were in the past' or something along those lines. I went to primary school with a number of part-Kuarna children, but I don't think any of them spoke the language. There was a part of the school garden just for native plants and things and it was called 'Wakwakko wirra', which means 'Children's Garden'. No-one speaks Kuarna as their first language anymore, but it's often taught to part-Kuarna children. I don't think there are any full-Kuarna people left.

    When European settlers arrived, they just took over the land and threw the Aboriginal people off. The Aboriginal people have a lot of beliefs about the land, particularly about them belonging to the land and not it to them. They never did anything to hurt or change the land, and never took so much that it couldn't replenish itself. When the Europeans arrived, they couldn't see any signs of it being inhabited like they were used to (buildings, structures, fires, et cetera) and declared it 'Terra Nullus'. Therefore, officially, the Aboriginal people didn't exist.

    Lots of Aboriginal tribes around the coastal areas were absolutely decimated. There are no Eora or Dhurug people left anymore (they were around the Sydney area), although a lot of words in Australian English comes from their languages, like 'Dingo', 'Kangaroo', 'Billabong', et cetera. There are actually quite a few tribes left but they're all in the centre, in the desert where the Europeans didn't particularly want to go. Some of the people from the more coastal areas had to go into the desert when the Europeans came, but they didn't know how to survive there.

    Today, the three main Aboriginal tribes left are the Anungu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (the second word is pronounced pidgeon-jar-uh) from around Uluru, the Arrernte from Alice Springs, and the Anungu Luritja who are between the two. If you look these places up on a map, it's some of the harshest, hottest, driest, most unforgiving country on the planet, so it's no surprise that they weren't pushed of their lands by Europeans. The three main language groups which are still 'healthy' (people of all age groups speak it as their first language) are Pitjantjatjara, Warlpiri, and Arrernte. I know that some of these people, the Pitjantjatjara at least, still live their traditional lifestyle, the same as they did before European settlement. In fact, it's possible that there are some groups from these tribes out there who have never been contacted by white people! However, the Pitjantjatjara people do have one of the largest, quickest-growing communities of Christians in the world - they're in the process of translating the rest of the Bible for them! They've had the New Testament for about 20 years and most of the didn't know there was more to the Bible than that!

    When the Europeans first came to Australia, they did lots of things that modern white Australians are quite ashamed of. Some of them were accidental, like infecting the Aboriginal peoples with diseased which their bodies couldn't handle, like the cold, which killed a lot of them. A lot of it wasn't, like shooting them, driving them off their land, and taking their children, particularly the half-caste children. The Stolen Generation (look it up) isn't actually a generation, it happened over a period of over a hundred years. There are lots of people still alive today, some only about 60 years old, who were part of the Stolen Generation - taken from their parents as children and forced into white society which they didn't understand. Some were placed with families and adopted and lived quite well, but most were just put in truly terrible 'homes' or orphanages and treated horribly. Lots were trained to be maidservents or farm labourers, especially the darker-skinned ones because white people thought they were too stupid to learn. Lots of people still get really angry about the Stolen Generation, although there's no-one left who did it and modern white Australians feel as bad about it as the Aboriginal people do (and most of us or our ancestors weren't even in Australia at the time!), but I know that a lot of the children who were a part of it just got on with their lives and are quite happy. I had an honourary grandmother from my church for a while who was part of it. I think she was the first time I'd ever heard of the Stolen Generation, but she was quite matter-of-fact about it even though I didn't quite understand. She had been taken when she was about 6 years old along with her 4 brothers and sister and lived in homes her entire life, but she had become a schoolteacher and she had been my pastor's schoolteacher! She was quite content with how her life had been, but her younger sister, Lois O'Donahue, is one of the most well-known Stolen Generation rights activist people. She changed her name to Lewitja. You should look her up, too.

    I'll write something another time more about European settlement rather than Aboriginal people as there's a lot to go through there!

    Also, just out of interest, what tribe was Rulu from, do you know? It sort of sounds like he might be from one of the Peninsulas, I know at least that the Nurungga people (or some other similar word) live on the Yorke Peninsula (I've just been there for a week. It's very Cornish. Just out of interest, a lot of the older people there, who were born in Australia, still speak with Cornish accents! A lot of the signage is in both Cornish and English!). There are still lots of Nurungga people around and most I think live in various communities, particularly the Port Pearce Community and Wardang Island.

    from Rachel.
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    Jordyn

    Posts : 138
    Join date : 2011-08-10
    Location : Indiana

    Re: History of America and Austraila

    Post  Jordyn on Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:54 pm

    Thank you so much Rachel. I will look some up and post later.
    jordyn

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